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The Teaching Space Podcast

The podcast is on pause for a year (as of August 2021) as I am tackling the final year of my masters in education (which I am doing alongside my full-time job). In the meantime, please revisit the considerable back catalogue of episodes. Also, give me a follow on Twitter, where I am still very active and sign up for my personal newsletter here. You can visit The Teaching Space website here: theteachingspace.com.

Thank you 🍏

Apr 17, 2021

Thanks to Daniela, who is a member of The Teaching Space Community, for suggesting this episode topic.

You can join the community at community.theteachingspace.com.

This topic has been influenced by my own experience as well a number of articles I read on the topic. I will link to the articles in the show notes which you will find at theteachingspace.com/118.

This episode will focus on teachers using Twitter for their own purposes rather than using it with students.

Highlights

What is EduTwitter? (02:50)

  • Educators on Twitter who generally use EduTwitter as a hashtag.

Positives (03:43)

  • It's a great way to connect with people from all over the world working in similar, or entirely different areas of education to you.
  • Building your network in this way can lead to job offers! (Remember AJ from episode 114?)
  • You can engage in interesting, topical discussions, get help, advice and help.
  • You can stay current by knowing what is being discussed in education right now.
  • It's an easy way to find links to interesting articles, podcasts, research, events etc.
  • Event hashtags are fab.
  • It's free PD (although often we forget to log it).
  • It's a great way to try publishing content e.g. tweetstorms.

Negatives (08.27)

  • Twitter is a 'social' media platform - invariably you will end up using it for work purposes during social time. This is a boundary that needs consideration.
  • If you are tweeting professionally, you need to consider your employer's viewpoint.
  • On self-promotion.
  • Discussions can turn nasty... not often, but they can.

EduTwitter Wellbeing Strategies (11:43)

  • It's all about boundaries. Think about how and when you will engage in Twitter conversation. Who will you be? Is yours a teaching only feed or a mix?
  • Think twice before participating in certain discussions e.g. isolation booths, 'prog' v 'trad' teachers, certain behaviour topics etc.
  • If you are going to participate and disagree, try to 'attack' arguments rather than the people making them (see Greg Ashman's article).
  • Carefully curate your feed, consider your 'bubble' - don't just follow your sector or people who look at sound like you.
  • Find hashtags of interest and check those and also use them.
  • Participate in Twitter chats.
  • Remember people often only show their 'best bits'.
  • If you need a break, remove the app from your phone.
  • Don't be afraid to unfollow people.
  • Mute words.
  • Be human.

Final Thoughts (20:33)

Treat Twitter as a community but ensure your boundaries are in place. And give me a follow if you're there or joining: MartineGuernsey.

Helpful links